Where to find a job or career

Indeed.com
Indeed is a leading job site with millions of job listings from thousands of websites, including company career sites, job boards, newspaper classifieds, associations, and other online sources of job postings. Users can also upload a resume and get a personalized resume link to share with employers. You can also research salaries, job trends, and more.

CareerBuilder.com
CareerBuilder is one of the largest job boards, providing job listings, resume posting, and career advice and resources to job seekers. CareerBuilder secures job listings directly from employers and has expanded local listings by partnering with many newspapers to incorporate their online classifieds.

Dice.com
Dice is the leading site for tech job seekers. You can search by company, job title, keyword, employment type, and location. Registered users can upload a resume, get salary information, store resumes and cover letters, and track jobs. You’ll also find career advice and tech news for job seekers.

Glassdoor.com
Glassdoor is a career community that helps people find jobs and companies recruit top talent. Glassdoor members can see the latest job listings and get access to user-generated content including company-specific salary reports, ratings and reviews, interview questions, and more.

Google Careers
Google for Jobs is a product from Google that aims to help job seekers find job listings that are right for them. Google for Jobs is a job search engine that compiles listings from many different sources, including other job search engines. Instead of using a specific job search site, users can simply type a job into their Google search bar. Google then pulls up related listings. Users can then narrow their search by type of job, location, company type, date posted, and more.

Idealist.com
Idealist is the premier clearinghouse for information on full-time internship and volunteer positions within the non-profit sector. You can identify target organizations by their mission and specific types of opportunities within various niches. Registered users can also search for contacts in fields or organizations of interest and message them for networking purposes.

LinkedIn.com
LinkedIn connects the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful. LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network on the Internet. You can search for jobs, identify contacts at employers who are advertising vacancies, and follow companies of interest on LinkedIn. Users can incorporate portfolio samples within their profile to showcase their offerings for prospective employers. LinkedIn works well for strong candidates conducting a passive jobs search where they want employers to find them.

LinkUp.com
If you want to avoid spam, scams, and duplicate job listings, LinkUp is the job site for you. LinkUp only posts jobs provided on company websites, providing applicants with often unadvertised jobs. Because the jobs come directly from company sites, you can be sure they are current openings.

Monster.com
Monster is one of the original job boards and has expanded to include a variety of other resources and apps for job seekers. Monster users can search for and apply for jobs online, post a resume, review company profiles, and get salary information and career advice.

US.jobs
Job seekers using US.jobs for their employment search have access to a database of more than a million unique, verified positions from nationwide employers. US.jobs is derived from a partnership between the Direct Employers Association and the National Association of State Workforce Agencies (NASWA) designed to improve the labor market and directly connect employers and job seekers. There’s a Veteran’s Job Bank as well as a searchable schedule of upcoming in-person career events.

Where to find a gig as a freelancer

Elance.com
Elance is the Internet’s biggest marketplace for legitimate freelance work. And, it’s my personal favourite of all the websites in this list. It provides a simple interface that allows you to search for jobs in any kind of niche. From Writing and Translation, to Web Design and Programming. Basically, people post jobs they want doing on the website, and you submit a proposal for it. It’s that simple. Regardless of how much money you want to make, the possibilities are endless: there are freelancers on subscribed making $1,000 to $100,000 a year.

Fiverr.com
Fiverr is a long established freelance site where everything costs a $5 minimum. It’s a simple and easy to use website, where you post the services you can provide: and if someone needs them, they’ll pay you to work. It takes the traditional Freelance way of working and turns it on it’s head. It also ensures you get paid before you complete any work so that you never find yourself ripped off. There is also scope to earn more than your $5 per job, with different levels for different services, such as: early delivery dates, extra work or ‘bolt-on’s for your services.

oDesk.com
oDesk is somewhat of a sister company to eLance, that helps freelancers find work in a wide range of areas. Out of the two sites, it’s down to your personal preference: but the oDesk’s design and Payment tracker app set it apart from the competition. This is a great website to get started on as a beginner as the average prices for jobs is lower, and it’s much easier to establish yourself as an up and coming freelancer.

Craigslist.com
Craigslist isn’t a site you’d think synonymous with Freelance Work – but it’s actually a hub of jobs and work to apply for. It’s a simple and easy to way to start to build a portfolio and make some money in the process. The normal client can vary between local businesses, college students and someone looking to get work done as quickly as possible. Air on the side of caution though, as sometimes you can find yourself chasing money for work you’ve done.

Freelancer.com
Freelancer is a ‘gameified’ version of the sites eLance and oDesk mentioned earlier. You have the ability to ‘level up’ by earning experience points from the projects you complete and the milestones you hit. There are no shortage of jobs on these sites and everything is channelled depending on your skills and abilities. Freelancer doesn’t have a free option that is as flexible as it’s competitors, and you find yourself paying to take tests and complete certain tasks. This plays into the hands of people posting projects, as it shows you’re committed and established, but it doesn’t really help you if you’re just getting started.

Crypto.com – The complete guide

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Crypto.com (MCO) reached the July 15 milestone to distribute crypto-spending cards to US-based users. The MCO cards unveiled their new design based on user demand and will be carried by Metropolitan Commercial Bank.

The MCO cards will carry no monthly or annual fees, and up to 5% cashback, along with airport lounge perks.

Kris Marszalek, Co-Founder and CEO of Crypto.com said:

“We are thrilled to announce our U.S. launch date and unveil our new card range with the Frosted Rose Gold card. Unrivaled perks and incredibly powerful Crypto.com App make the MCO Visa card a must-have card for every cryptocurrency holder in the U.S.”

The central hub for crypto spending is still the Crypto.com app, which can be used to reserve a card, and also verify one’s identity. The exchanges of crypto-to-fiat also happen through the Crypto.com app, to be able to load the VISA card. Otherwise, users can pay in a peer-to-peer fashion using cryptocurrency, through the Crypto.com chain.

Crypto.com, formerly Monaco, had a delay of around a year to launch its new cards, after the loss of the WaveCrest provider made the old cards unusable.

Following the news, the market price of MCO still sank toward $4.88, down 12% on the week, following a Monday sell-off across all coins. Cypto.com Chain (CRO) sank to the $0.07 range after touching 10 cents, following a token sale and Huobi International listing. Traders also noticed volumes that increased sharply just before the Huobi listing announcement:

Twitter Post

The MCO card news arrives at a time of a shifting attitude for digital assets. Bitcoin (BTC) dragged down all prices as it sank below $10,200, with predictions of returning to the $9,000 tier.

Source: https://cryptovest.com/news/cryptocom-mco-starts-shipping-crypto-cards-to-the-us/