Where to find a gig as a freelancer

Elance.com
Elance is the Internet’s biggest marketplace for legitimate freelance work. And, it’s my personal favourite of all the websites in this list. It provides a simple interface that allows you to search for jobs in any kind of niche. From Writing and Translation, to Web Design and Programming. Basically, people post jobs they want doing on the website, and you submit a proposal for it. It’s that simple. Regardless of how much money you want to make, the possibilities are endless: there are freelancers on subscribed making $1,000 to $100,000 a year.

Fiverr.com
Fiverr is a long established freelance site where everything costs a $5 minimum. It’s a simple and easy to use website, where you post the services you can provide: and if someone needs them, they’ll pay you to work. It takes the traditional Freelance way of working and turns it on it’s head. It also ensures you get paid before you complete any work so that you never find yourself ripped off. There is also scope to earn more than your $5 per job, with different levels for different services, such as: early delivery dates, extra work or ‘bolt-on’s for your services.

oDesk.com
oDesk is somewhat of a sister company to eLance, that helps freelancers find work in a wide range of areas. Out of the two sites, it’s down to your personal preference: but the oDesk’s design and Payment tracker app set it apart from the competition. This is a great website to get started on as a beginner as the average prices for jobs is lower, and it’s much easier to establish yourself as an up and coming freelancer.

Craigslist.com
Craigslist isn’t a site you’d think synonymous with Freelance Work – but it’s actually a hub of jobs and work to apply for. It’s a simple and easy to way to start to build a portfolio and make some money in the process. The normal client can vary between local businesses, college students and someone looking to get work done as quickly as possible. Air on the side of caution though, as sometimes you can find yourself chasing money for work you’ve done.

Freelancer.com
Freelancer is a ‘gameified’ version of the sites eLance and oDesk mentioned earlier. You have the ability to ‘level up’ by earning experience points from the projects you complete and the milestones you hit. There are no shortage of jobs on these sites and everything is channelled depending on your skills and abilities. Freelancer doesn’t have a free option that is as flexible as it’s competitors, and you find yourself paying to take tests and complete certain tasks. This plays into the hands of people posting projects, as it shows you’re committed and established, but it doesn’t really help you if you’re just getting started.

Crypto.com – The complete guide

Get your $50 signup bonus for your free visa card
https://platinum.crypto.com/r/gzzjwpyyjf

Crypto.com (MCO) reached the July 15 milestone to distribute crypto-spending cards to US-based users. The MCO cards unveiled their new design based on user demand and will be carried by Metropolitan Commercial Bank.

The MCO cards will carry no monthly or annual fees, and up to 5% cashback, along with airport lounge perks.

Kris Marszalek, Co-Founder and CEO of Crypto.com said:

“We are thrilled to announce our U.S. launch date and unveil our new card range with the Frosted Rose Gold card. Unrivaled perks and incredibly powerful Crypto.com App make the MCO Visa card a must-have card for every cryptocurrency holder in the U.S.”

The central hub for crypto spending is still the Crypto.com app, which can be used to reserve a card, and also verify one’s identity. The exchanges of crypto-to-fiat also happen through the Crypto.com app, to be able to load the VISA card. Otherwise, users can pay in a peer-to-peer fashion using cryptocurrency, through the Crypto.com chain.

Crypto.com, formerly Monaco, had a delay of around a year to launch its new cards, after the loss of the WaveCrest provider made the old cards unusable.

Following the news, the market price of MCO still sank toward $4.88, down 12% on the week, following a Monday sell-off across all coins. Cypto.com Chain (CRO) sank to the $0.07 range after touching 10 cents, following a token sale and Huobi International listing. Traders also noticed volumes that increased sharply just before the Huobi listing announcement:

Twitter Post

The MCO card news arrives at a time of a shifting attitude for digital assets. Bitcoin (BTC) dragged down all prices as it sank below $10,200, with predictions of returning to the $9,000 tier.

Source: https://cryptovest.com/news/cryptocom-mco-starts-shipping-crypto-cards-to-the-us/

How to live frugally

Do it yourself:
Make your own
Do it yourself
Cut your own hair
Maintain stuff

Make money:
Sell your clutter
Participate in free sweepstakes
Donate blood

Shopping:
Look for used first
Buy things you need, not things you want
Don’t shop around for fun
Use a 30-day list for purchases
Don’t buy cheap, but for life
Only buy during sales
Make a grocery list
Start couponing
Use cashback

Finances:
Stop paying interest
Pay your credit cards in full
Stop paying interest
Pay everything with cashback credit cards
Cancel subscriptions

Cars:
Go with one car
Go with a smaller car
Get rid of your car
Commute by bike
Carpool or ride the bus
Walk
Save gas

House:
Go with a smaller house
Save energy
Save on heating

Eating:
Eat out less
Eat out frugally
Brown bag it to work
Reduce convenience foods
Cook ahead
Eat less meat
Eat a cheap breakfast
Drink tap water
Grow your own crops
Make your own coffee

Health:
Exercise at home
Eat healthily
Quit smoking
Alcohol in moderation
Sweets in moderation
Drink water

Clothes:
Adopt a minimalist wardrobe
Wear more than once, if it’s still clean
Sun-dry clothes

Entertainment:
Cut out cable
Use the (online)library
Find free entertainment
Stay home with friends

General:
Gift frugally
Batch errands into one day
Travel frugally
Change to a cheap prepaid cell plan
Shop around once a year
Telecommute
Plan ahead
Have frugal holidays (e.g. christmas)
Share things between friends and family
Donate your body to science
Charge your things at work, school, public